Cornyn & Warren Introduce the Bankruptcy Venue Reform Act of 2017

Earlier today, Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) introduced the Bankruptcy Venue Reform Act of 2017. The bill would require companies to seek bankruptcy protection where they have their principal assets or their principal executive offices. And it would eliminate the possibility of filing where they are incorporated and restrict their ability to file where an affiliate’s case is pending. The end result? The bill would effectively limit access to popular bankruptcy courts in New York and Delaware. If passed, this would represent a seismic shift for corporate bankruptcies.

The Rationale for the Bill: Preventing Corporate Abuse

Sens. Cornyn and Warren said in a joint statement that the bill is meant to strengthen the integrity of the bankruptcy system and build public confidence by preventing companies from “shopping” for favorable courts. The bill is also intended to allow employees at bankrupt companies, small business creditors, and others to participate in cases that will have tremendous impacts on their lives.

“Workers, creditors, and consumers lose when corporations manipulate the system to file for bankruptcy wherever they please. I’m glad to work with Senator Cornyn to prevent big companies from cherry-picking courts that they think will rule in their favor and to crack down on this corporate abuse of our nation’s bankruptcy laws.” -Sen. Warren 

The bill is endorsed by the Commercial Law League, Texas Bankruptcy Bar Association, Texas Hotel & Lodging Association, Boston Bar Association, Ag & Business Legal Strategies, and… the Iowa Bankers Association.

Another Viewpoint: Litigation at the Speed of Business

Proponents of the current system, however, argue that experienced courts and judges can better handle complicated issues in a big bankruptcy case. This leads to greater predictability, thus reducing the cost, risk and delay associated with bankruptcy filings. And those benefits, in turn, help to save businesses, preserve jobs, and reduce creditor losses.

The bill faces opposition from Gov. Carney and Delaware’s three federal lawmakers, who said in their own joint-statement that more than two-thirds of U.S. businesses in the Fortune 500 incorporate in Delaware to gain access to “Delaware’s world-class bench and bar with exceptional expertise in corporate legal issues, including bankruptcy.”

“Denying American businesses the ability to file for bankruptcy in the courts of their choice would not only hurt Delaware’s economy but also hurt businesses of all sizes and the national economy as a whole. Our economy thrives when the bankruptcy system is fair, predictable, and efficient. Experienced bankruptcy judges are critical to ensuring that companies can restructure in a way that saves jobs and preserves value.”

This is something I can now begin to speak to from some level of personal experience. After attending the Pre-Admission Conference for new Delaware lawyers held by the Delaware Supreme Court, two themes stood out. An unwavering insistence on civility and the highest ethical and professional standards. And an uncompromising commitment to delivering “litigation at the speed of business.”

Further Reading: Full Text of the Bill

The bill’s complete text is available here.

Mette K.

2nd Circuit Reverses Course on Cramdown Interest Rates

A simple proposition—that secured lenders are entitled to receive payments with a present value at least equal to the amount of their claim—has proven surprisingly difficult to apply as courts have pondered whether to follow a “formula approach” or a “market approach” to establish an appropriate “cramdown” interest rate. (A primer is available here if you are new to the debate.)

Secured lenders have scored a significant win in the recent Second Circuit decision in the Momentive case, In re MPM Silicones. Siding with the Sixth Circuit, the Second Circuit has decided that the prevailing market rate for comparable debt should be used—if there is an efficient market for such debt—and that the formula approach should be used only if no efficient market exists.

Market-Rate Schmarket-Rate… What’s the Big Deal?

Theoretically, whether you build up from a base rate and fully adjust for the characteristics of a loan or whether you consider comparable market loans to determine an appropriate interest rate, you should end up at roughly the same place. In reality, however, courts applying a formula approach have approved interests rates that are lower than a market rate approach would support… sometimes absurdly so.

By way of analogy, consider an ordinary real estate valuation. A real estate appraiser will consider different valuation methods—market comparables, replacement cost, and income capitalization.  These three approaches will often provide different values for a property, so an appraiser must reconcile the varying results.  Sometimes differences are minor. But depending on the property and the appraisal’s objective, one of the approaches may be more suitable than the others.

Similarly, in the bankruptcy context, the formula approach and market approach can support different interest rates, and one of the approaches may be more suitable in Chapter 11 than the other. And uncertainty over which approach to apply in Chapter 11, combined with courts’ self-imposed reluctance to impose a risk premium of more than 1-3% under the formula approach, has spawned significant litigation with very real consequences.

The Original Momentive Rulings: The Formula Approach

Momentive, one of the world’s largest producers of silicone products, filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy case in 2014. At the time, it had two outstanding series of senior lien notes, one in the principal amount of $1.1 billion with an 8.875% interest rate and the other in the principal amount of $250 million with a 10% interest rate. Momentive’s plan proposed, in essence, that these claims would be satisfied with long term replacement notes with a below-market rate of interest based on the “formula” approach, e.g., 4.1% and 4.85%, respectively.  This represented a total reduction of approximately $70 million in the amount of interest payments over the life of the notes.

The lower courts approved this plan, expressing concern that a market rate of interest would “overcompensate” cramdown lenders. Why? Because market rates include transaction costs and profits indicative of new loans. By following the formula approach, the lower courts could disregard these add-ons and felt they could truly “put the creditor in the same economic position that it would have been in had it received the value of its claim immediately.” The decisions also reflected a general tendency to limit risk adjustments to a range of between 1-3%.  The result was the approval of new notes that bore interest rates far below the original issue interest rates and current market rates, and an appeal to the Second Circuit.

The 2nd Circuit Reverses Course: A Market Approach Is Preferred

The Second Circuit rejected the lower courts’ reasoning.  Disregarding available efficient market rates, it stated, would be a major departure from long-standing precedent dictating that the best way to determine value is exposure to an efficient market.

“[W]here, as here, an efficient market may exist that generates an interest rate that is apparently acceptable to sophisticated parties dealing at arms-length, we conclude, consistent with footnote 14 [of Till], that such a rate is preferable to a formula improvised by a court.”

And what is an efficient market?  In keeping with the Fifth Circuit, the Court described it as one where, for example, “they offer a loan with a term, size and collateral comparable to the forced loan contemplated under the cramdown plan.” The Second Circuit suggested that an efficient market might exist for notes similar to the replacement notes at issue in Momentive, but it remanded the question to the Bankruptcy Court to decide.

A Cliffhanger Ending…

Will Judge Drain decide that an efficient market exists on remand?

Judge Drain’s bench ruling suggests he may not, as he noted that “it is highly unlikely that there will ever be an efficient market that does not include a profit element, fees and costs, thereby violating Till’s first principles, since capturing profit, fees and costs is the marketplace lender’s reason for being.”

But the Second Circuit opinion could be read to downplay his concerns, as it approvingly cited the testimony of the first lien noteholders’ expert, who testified that when notes are priced at the market rate noteholders are “being compensated for the underlying risk that they are taking” and not for any “imbedded profit.”

Stay tuned to find out what happens in Episode 4: The Cramdown Rematch.

The Bottom Line

Meanwhile, the Second Circuit’s opinion significantly reduces uncertainty around the application of Till’s formula rate to Chapter 11 cramdown notes in the Second Circuit and appears to be good news for secured creditors, who have been facing threats of cramdown with below-market take-back debt in restructuring negotiations, and a loss for debtors and unsecured creditors who might benefit by extracting value at their expense. Although it is also possible that the two-step approach adopted here could simply shift litigation efforts to focus instead on whether there exists an efficient market in the first instance.

Mette Kurth

BCBG Creditors’ Committee Organizational Meeting: March 9, 2017

Shortly before midnight on February 28, 2017, BCBG Max Azria Global Holdings, LLC and affiliates filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the Southern District of New York. The United States Trustee has scheduled a meeting to form an unsecured creditors’ committee on March 9, 2017 in New York.

Store Closings and “Right Sizing”

The Bankruptcy Court has entered an interim order authorizing store closing sales at 120 BCBG locations, predominantly retail and factory stores. Each of the stores to be closed has historically operated at a loss. Collectively, the stores generated $10.3 million in losses in 2016, representing 63% of BCBG’s total losses from stores with a negative contribution margin. BCBG estimates the store closings will generate $20.1 million.  The liquidation sales commenced before the bankruptcy filing and are expected to continue through the end of April. It appears that, at least in the short term, about 50 of BCBG’s stores will remain open, together with a significant number of its partner shops located inside major department stores.

A Bankruptcy Sale…. Maybe?

BCBG has also filed a draft plan with a “toggle” feature, allowing for either (a) the sale of BCBG’s assets to a third party; or (b) a debt for equity conversion on terms to be negotiated.

BCBG says that it has begun marketing its assets, and it has filed a motion to approve bidding procedures. The motion includes a request to allow BCBG to provide a stalking horse bidder-if one is found-with break-up fees and expense reimbursements.  The proposed procedures, if approved, would require potential bidders to submit preliminary bid documents to BCBG and its investment banker, Jeffries, in order to receive due diligence information. They would also require interested bidders to provide non-binding indications of interest by March 30, 2017, with an auction tentatively to follow by May 22, 2017.  But the procedures proposed by BCBG and its lenders also grant them wide latitude to move forward, instead, with a debt for equity conversion… the terms of which have yet to be negotiated.

More Information

Additional information about the case, including a list of stores scheduled to be closed and the company’s proposed sale procedures and plan, can be found on the website maintained by BCBG’s claim agent, Donlin Recano.

 

Got Interest? You May Not Be Able to Protect It from Preference Exposure Under Section 546(e)

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“Settlement payments,” e.g., the transfer of cash or securities to complete a securities transaction, are given safe harbor and protected from disgorgement as preferences under the Bankruptcy Code.