Promise Healthcare Files For Bankruptcy, Promises Improved Financial Health

Promise Healthcare Group and numerous affiliates filed for Chapter 11 protection Sunday night in Delaware.

What Ails Promise Healthcare?

Promise Healthcare is a Florida-based specialty post-acute care healthcare provider operating several hospitals and skilled nursing facilities across nine states. It operates two short-term acute care hospitals, 14 long-term acute care hospitals and two skilled nursing facilities. According to the company, Promise Healthcare is one of the largest long-term acute care hospital operators in the U.S.

“While I believe that the Debtors’ overall business is fundamentally strong, [Promise Healthcare has] been operating with an unsustainable balance sheet due to current industry dynamics and certain underperforming facilities within [its] portfolio.”  – Andrew Hinkelman, FTI Consulting, Chief Financial Officer

Like many hospital operators that have filed chapter 11 recently, such as ManorCare Health Services, Promise Healthcare has suffered from significant reductions in reimbursement rates from The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Average reimbursement rates for non-qualifying patients have dropped roughly $41,000 per stay industry wide. Coupled with Promise’s inability to adjust operating cost structures, this has directly impacted profitability.

What Are the Next Steps on the Road to Recovery?

Step 1: Sell Non-Core Assets.

Promise Healthcare has already received  purchase offers for several non-core assets.  Offers in hand, it hopes to complete sales and use the proceeds to pay down secured loans over the next three months.

  • The Silver Lake Facility:  L.A. Downtown Medical Center has offered to purchase Promise Healthcare’s Silver Lake facility section for $84.15 million. The offer will be subjected to overbids in a bankruptcy auction.  A sale closing is planned for January or February of 2019.
  • The St. Alexius Facility: Promise Healthcare has been looking for a buyer for its facility in St. Louis for the past year-and-a-half to two years. However, it has been hindered by the termination of its Medicare program in November, the need for substantial capital improvements, and heavy operating losses.  Despite these challenges, Promise Healthcare is negotiating a stock sale which it hopes to conclude by year end.
  • San Diego Property: Promise Healthcare is also in final negotiations to sell its San Diego property.  It hopes to conclude this sale as well by year end.

Step 2: Obtain Postpetition Financing.

Promise Healthcare has requested $85 million in postpetition financing, including a rollup of its $65 million prepetition asset-based revolving loan facility and a new money commitment of $20 million, with prepetition revolving lender Wells Fargo Bank as agent.

Step 3: Come Up With an Exit Strategy.

Over the next 6 months, Promise Healthcare will search for an exit. That could be a buyer for the business. Or an equity sponsor who will support a reorganization.  Houlihan has already contacted 77 financial and strategic partners and received “several” indications of interest. Ultimately, Promise Healthcare hopes to file a bid procedures motion by the end of the year, with the intention of closing a sale around April 2019.

Prime Clerk is the claims agent. Additional information about the case is available here.

Mette K.

 

 

Papa Gino’s & D’Angelo Enter Bankruptcy

PGHC Holdings, operator of New England-based Papa Gino’s and D’Angelo, filed for chapter 11 protection on Monday.  Not surprisingly, the case is pending in Delaware.

Reasons for the Bankruptcy? Same Old/Same Old

Also not surprising, the bankruptcy follows performance struggles faced by both Papa Gino’s and D’Angelo as a result of:

  • Evolving consumer dining preferences;
  • Increased labor costs; and
  • Increasing competition among national chains.

Remember Real Mex, for example? Or Bertucci’s? Restaurant growth is continuing to slim down, folks….

In addition to operational factors, Papa Gino’s and D’Angelo have a substantial debt load that they have been unable to service. This includes: $18.5 million in first-lien, secured debt; $34.2 million in second-lien, secured debt; $39.9 million in unsecured mezzanine debt; and $9 million in unsecured trade debt, lease obligations and repair obligations. And Pappa Ginos and D’Angelo are in default under both the first and second lien agreements while the 16% senior subordinated notes matured last June. Ouch.

What Happens to Papa Gino’s and D’Angelo’s Next?

Although Papa Gino’s may be a “New England original,” its bankruptcy plans are not.

The company intends to close roughly 92 locations (47 Papa Gino’s / 45 D’Angelo). In addition, they have secured a $13.8 million in post-petition financing from an existing, secured lender to keep the company afloat. And a credit bid by the lender’s designee, a Wynnchurch Capital portfolio company, serves as the “stalking horse,” opening offer to purchase both the Papa Gino’s and D’Angelo restaurants. The stalking horse credit bid is $20 million plus assumption of certain liabilities.  Ultimately, a bankruptcy auction will determine the highest and best bidder.

The sale timeline is:

  • Bid procedures shall be established by December 17, 2018;
  • The auction is to be held by January 28, 2019;
  • A hearing on the sale shall be held and sale order entered by January 31, 2019; and
  • The sale closing shall take place by January 31, 2019.

Papa Gino's

Papa Gino’s and D’Angelo have issued a press release. The proposed sale transaction, they say, will significantly strengthen their financial resources. This will allow the restaurants to remodel and modernize across MassachusettsNew HampshireRhode Island, and Connecticut. They also plan to open additional restaurants throughout New England.

Hungry? Look forward to enhanced on-line ordering capability as well.

Mette K.

Filing Alert: #Remington Files Chapter 11 in Delaware

Without a foil to drive sales, and beset by litigation, Remington Outdoor Company has sought Chapter 11 protection Delaware.

Company Background.

Founded in 1816, Remington is one of the oldest gun makers in the world.  Its products include the Bushmaster AR-15 style rifle that was used in the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting. Twenty children between six and seven years old, as well as six adult staff members, were killed. The company has been sued by victims’ family members.  In addition, the company’s sales fell 30% last year in the midst of an industry-wide “Trump slump.”

The Fast-Track Plan and Support Agreement.

Remington reports $100 million to $500 million in assets and liabilities. Its filing includes:

  • A plan, disclosure statement, and restructuring support agreement between Remington and its major secured creditors;
  • A motion seeking approval of a $100 million in financing, a $45 million bridge loan, a $193 million asset-based loan facility.

Under the fast-track plan, Remington’s key creditors – reportedly, Franklin Templeton Investments and JPMorgan Asset Management – would exchange their debt holdings for most of the company’s equity. Concurrently, the company’s current owner, Cerberus Capital, would relinquish its ownership interests. Remington has already begun soliciting approval of its plan. It has asked to forgo the usual procedure of filing a full schedule of its debts and assets.  And it has requested a voting deadline of April 26th and hopes to confirm its plan around May 3rd.

Remington has said that its efforts to finance a turnaround were complicated by parties who were reluctant to lend to a gun manufacturer. The creditors in the current deal reportedly agreed to the “debt-for-equity swap” prior to the Parkland shooting, and it is unclear if any have since pulled out.

Additional Information.

The case number is 18-10684.  Additional information, including the docket of filed pleadings and instructions for filing claims, can be found on its claim agent’s website: PrimeClerk.com.

Mette K.

Woodbridge Committee Formation Meeting Scheduled for 12/14/17

Woodbridge Group of Companies, LLC, a Sherman Oaks, California-based real estate finance and development company, has filed for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware.  The committee formation meeting is scheduled for December 14, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. at the Doubletree Hotel in Wilmington, Delaware.

The company says it intends to file a plan to substantially reduce its debt and transition its real estate investment business to institutional financing sources. It hopes to reorganize and successfully emerge as a profitable real estate investment before the end of 2018.

Additional information is available here.

Mette K.